Johann Kepler & Kika Thorne

An invitation for singers to negotiate the distance of the planets in order that we may hear them (2008)

Silkscreen, 20" x 30" cotton paper, glow in the dark ink, black light
Exhibited in Elastic at The Apartment, Vancouver

"A guiding force since 2007 are the cosmological charts of Johann Kepler. Born in 1571, in Württemberg, Germany, Kepler published Mysterium Cosmographicum, 1596, Harmonice Mundi, 1618 and the Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae, 1618–21, which mapped the antique solar system, realized equations to calibrate planetary orbits and proposed a physical explanation of the motions of planets, namely, “magnetic arms” extending from the sun. In An Invitation to Singers to negotiate the distance of the planets in order that we may hear them (2008), Thorne employs the algorithm of planetary movement as a musical score, making legible the literal harmony of the solar system. Singers may produce the drone of each planet, transforming Kepler’s notation into song. Their collective harmonies sound the years passing in space, the effect of being beyond the event horizon, inside the black hole." — Lee Plested, 2008

An Invitation for Singers... (2008) Courtesy The Apartment, Vancouver

An invitation for singers to  negotiate the distance of... (2008)